This program is made possible by a grant from New Hampshire Humanities. Learn more at https://www.nhhumanities.org


In this first-person interpretive program, Judith Black introduces American Lucy Stone, the first woman hired by the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society as a public speaker and the "Shining Star" of the Abolition and Women's Rights Movements. The presenter dispels well-worn platitudes about the antebellum North by interjecting historic and personal truths about these social reform movements. Her presentation also paints a dynamic and detailed picture of what it takes to change the world you are born into. Follow Lucy as she makes her case for tax resistance, her challenges to marriage laws and motherhood, and her pro-Emancipation response to the Civil War. Go with her to The American Equal Rights Association Convention in May 1869, where she eloquently supports the 15th Amendment, which gave African-American men the vote.
Judith Black’s historic tales, commissioned by the US Dept. of the Interior, NPR, Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities, the USS Constitution Museum and many others, have received standing ovations at the Smithsonian Institution and Storytelling Festivals worldwide. She has keynoted the National Interpreters Conference: a standing ovation met her address on discerning truths from exploring multiple vantage points on our national history. One of America’s finest storytellers, she was inducted into the National Storytelling Network’s Circle of Excellence "For exceptional commitment and exemplary contribution to the art of storytelling" in 2001.